One Writer’s Journey

January 20, 2020

Ten Most Checked Out Books

Filed under: Uncategorized — suebe @ 1:10 am
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In celebration of its 125th anniversary, the New York Public Library ran the numbers to see which 10 books have been checked out the most.  I have to admit that there were a few surprises.

The top 10 books along with their circulation numbers are:

  • The Snowy Day by Ezra Jack Keats: 485,583 checkouts
  • The Cat in the Hat by Dr. Seuss: 469,650 checkouts
  • 1984 by George Orwell: 441,770 checkouts
  • Where the Wild Things Are by Maurice Sendak: 436,016 checkouts
  • To Kill a Mockingbird by Harper Lee: 422,912 checkouts
  • Charlotte’s Web by E.B. White: 337,948 checkouts
  • Fahrenheit 451 by Ray Bradbury: 316,404 checkouts
  • How to Win Friends and Influence People by Dale Carnegie: 284,524 checkouts
  • Harry Potter and the Sorcerer’s Stone by J.K. Rowling: 231,022 checkouts
  • The Very Hungry Caterpillar by Eric Carle: 189,550 checkouts

I’m really glad that there are so  many books for young readers.  I expected there to be a Dr. Seuss book but why couldn’t it have been one of my favorites?  As a child, my favorite was One Fish Two Fish Red Fish Blue Fish, quite possibly because it was the only Dr. Seuss book we owned.  My mother loathed Dr. Seuss.  As a teen and even today, my favorite is The Lorax.

I’m a little disappointed Twain didn’t make it.  But my dad was a Twain fan so I grew up on Twain.  My favorite?  Connecticut Yankee.

I’ve read eight of the ten books.  Although I’ve read bits and pieces of both Fahrenheit 451 and How to Win Friends and Influence People, I’ve never read either book in their entirety.  I’m going to do something about that.

But I have read 1984 several times.  I read it in 9th grade when I was reading all kinds of post-apocalyptic fiction including 1984 and Brave New World.  Then lit teachers started assigning 1984.  

So now manyof these books have you read?  If you want to read more about the study and the results, there is an article here on NPR.

–SueBE

November 28, 2018

NPR: Best Books of 2018

Filed under: Uncategorized — suebe @ 1:50 am
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What?  This is not just another book list.

During the fall of each year, NPR Books staff asks for suggestions from staff members as well as book critics.  “Send us your favorite books of they year.”  The responses come in and are reviewed by NPR Books as they take care to eliminate duplicates and work for a good mix and balance.  Not sure what they mean by mix and balance.  Click through to Best Books of 2018 and you will quickly see what I mean.

The list is 319 titles long and fully searchable.  You can even select multiple filters but beware. This isn’t an either/or option.  If you select “Comics and Graphic Novels” and “Young Adult,” you get the two young adult graphic novels.

Select Young Adult and you get 22 items.  Mouse over a book cover and you get a brief description. Click on it and you are taken to a longer description.  This is going to take me a while to check out everything I find intriguing.

Oh, something else to keep in mind.  Pull up the full list, then go to Young Adult, and come back to the full list and the books will be in a different order.  That’s a bit of a problem because I want to find out about the one with the red truck on the cover.  It is no longer at the top of the page.

I heard about this list from my friend Traci Sorrell.  Her book We Are Grateful: Otsaliheliga is on the list. As much as I try to stay up on new books, I’ve only read a few of these and I’ve spotted several that are new to me that I find intriguing. There’s the graphic novel Photographic by Isabel Quintero about photographer Graciela Iturbide. The truck book is Trail of Lightning by Rebecca Roanhorse, a postapocalyptic novel set among the Dine.  I’m also eager to read Dreamers, a picture book by Yuyi Morales about a family coming to a new country.

If you’ll excuse me, I need to pop over to my library’s catalog and start requesting books.

–SueBE

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