One Writer’s Journey

December 29, 2017

Storystorm 2018: Idea Generation

Filed under: Uncategorized — suebe @ 1:19 am
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Start 2018 with a batch of new story ideas by taking part in Storystorm.  At one point in time, this program, organized by author Tara Lazar, was known as PiBoIdMo (Picture Book Idea Month) and took place in November.  But Tara wanted to expand it beyond picture books.

Now all types of children’s writers participate.  Throughout January you keep track of the ideas you generate.  The goal is to have 30 ideas by the end of the month.  There are inspirational posts and prizes for all who complete the program.  You can find out more about it here.

I found Storystorm so inspirational in 2017 that I didn’t quit when January ended.  I kept on adding to my list.  As I write this on 12/28, my list is something like 320 ideas long.  Yeah, I was a little disappointed.  I wanted one per day.

Some people discount this type of idea generation.  Who cares if you collect ideas if you don’t write them all?

  1.  Not all ideas are created equal.  Some simply do not measure up.
  2. By getting into the habit of generating story ideas, you get into the habit of generating ideas.  This my just be my opinion, but in my not-so-humble opinion, generating story ideas leads to generating other ideas.  Your stories become more original.
  3. Your list becomes a handy tool.  I have several projects that I plan to work on next year that came together because of this list.  I also use it when I need to come up with ideas for a query or pitch.  Or a nonfiction publisher puts out a call for proposals.

This paragraph is an update to the original post:  Lazar is now taking registrations.  Comment on the announcment post on her blog (linked here) to register.

This program is amazingly inspirational.  Why not take part and start your writing year in a whirlwind of creativity?

For more on idea generation, see “Idea Generation: Where Do You Get Your Ideas” and “3 Places to Turn for Story Ideas.”

–SueBE

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December 19, 2017

Titles and Wordplay: An Opportunity to Make Your Own Story

Filed under: Uncategorized — suebe @ 4:26 am
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Recently I read a post about how illustrator Jake Parker came up with cover for The 12 Sleighs of ChristmasOh, it’s just like the 12 Days of Christmas.  Funny!   Before long, I too was playing with the title of the carol.

The 12 Brays of Christmas, a Missouri mules picture book.

The 12 Greys of Christmas, a picture book of alien encounters.

Drays, phrase, mays or maize . . .

The 12 Maize of Christmas, colorful corn for Chris Kringle.

Whether you start with a carol or a folk tale, wordplay is a great opportunity to generate story ideas.  My son’s favorite when he was a preschooler was the Three Little Pears.  We had started out with the made up story The Three Little Rocket Ships, which he liked because he was a rocket crazy kid who could tell a Mercury Redstone from an Atlas at a glance.  But the story he loved was the Three Little Pears.

Little Pears.  Little Squares.  Little Mares.

When you get into the habit of playing with words, the possibilities are endless.  Kids love silly.  You just need to find something that you can use to generate a workable story.  You can play around to come up with your title and story idea, your setting (New York, New Pork, New Fork) and character names (see Three Little Pears) and more.

Granted your brain has to be in a playful mood but that’s okay.  When it is take advantage of this opportunity to generate a little of silly story ideas.

–SueBE

 

 

October 11, 2017

3 Places to Turn for Story Ideas

One of my friends and I ended up chatting about idea generation yesterday.  I may go a week or so without an idea.  But then I have 5 or so in a day.  I keep a list, starting a new list each year.  So far the one for 237 ideas on it.  This morning it had 232.

Where do I get my ideas?  Because I write so much nonfiction, any time I’m at a museum or reading an article, a new idea might be just around the corner.  Others, some nonfiction and some fiction, are inspired by a line of text in a story.  Or something I overhear.  I’m a touch dyslexic so when I’m especially tired I tend to misread things.  That’s led to a lot of wacky story ideas.

If you are someone who could use a spot of help when it comes to idea generation, here are three places you can turn:

Editor Alli Brydon will be posting a writing prompt for children’s literature every Monday on Twitter.  You can either follow @allibrydon or search on #kidlitbot.  Read more about this new initiative here on Tara Lazar’s blog.

Inktober is a month-long illustration challenge.  You can read a bit about it here or search for illustrations from participating illustrators on Twitter (#inktober).  A friend of mine, Katie Wools, is participating so I’ve seen her illustrations and noticed several more on Twitter.  I did a search and couldn’t believe the enormous variety of work both in topic and in style.  Check it out and you are sure to come up with some ideas.

Last but not least, don’t’ forget about Illustration Friday.  This is a weekly illustration prompt.  I hesitate to say always but I think it is always a single word prompt.  Use that word to generate your own ideas.  Or look through the work presented.  Like Inktober, the range of topics and styles is vast.

Enjoy following the trail of great illustrations to a new idea of your own!

–SueBE

September 13, 2017

In-search-of-ideas: Mining Everyday Mysteries at the Library of Congress

Filed under: Uncategorized — suebe @ 1:18 am
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I get a wide variety of updates sent to my in-box and that variety includes the Library of Congress.  Not too long ago, I saw that the library had a series called “Everyday Mysteries.”

Take minute to check this out.  Although it is described as “Fun Science Facts from the Library of Congress,” there is a bit of history as well.  Not that it is divided into science and history.  Instead it is divided, more or less, by discipline.

Agriculture includes:

Biology includes:

The list goes on and on and includes Botany, Chemistry, Geography, Home Economics, Physics and more.  Follow the links, read the material and you could be set for ideas for well over a year.

Working my way back from the “Everyday Mysteries,” I quickly found Science Reference Services.  The home page of this division included a link to the new reference guide, “ENTOMOPHAGY: Human Consumption of Insects for Food.”  As with other LOC reference guides, this one includes an overview as well as lists of general resources and specialty resources on the topic.  Not interested in Entomophagy?  You can find a complete list of the guides here.

I also found a link to the science division blog, Inside Adams.  How is it that I’ve been reading the general blog for years as well as the Folklife blog but knew nothing about the science blog?  Sometimes I embarrass myself.

Any time you are in need of a science based idea to spur your writing forward, take some time to explore the Library of Congress.  In addition to digitizing historic materials, they are also constantly adding new offerings to help students, teachers, and writers find interesting material.

For more on the Library of Congress, check out this post on their teacher’s guides and other materials organized and made easily available for teachers.

–SueBE

April 21, 2017

ISO Ideas

Filed under: Uncategorized — suebe @ 1:26 am
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ISO ideasYesterday I mentioned how inspirational I found the Library of Congress Magazine.  Apparently I’m not the only one who finds inspiration in this library’s amazing collection.  Check out this post from Jann Alexander in which she discusses the inspiration she finds in the library’s print and photography collections.

If you’ve never spent any time poking around in the library’s online offerings, do yourself a favor.  But not if you have a deadline fast approaching.  Go write and then come give it a good look. You will find photos and engineering records of historic buildings, Abraham Lincoln’s papers, and even an Afghanistan web archive.  This isn’t just about the archives themselves.  Some collections also include a tab of articles or essays about the materials contained therein.

But this isn’t all that Alexander talks about in her post.  She also discusses an archive of oral histories collected by Story Corps.org.  Interviews range in topic from how someone found their calling to parenting, including a discussion between Chris and Gabe Lopez on being transgender and hoping his mother would still accept him. Gabe is now 9 years-old so this is a real eye opener about how young children dealing with being trans. The Story Corps recordings are technically podcasts with a new offering put up each week.  Consider listening and see where other people’s stories take you in your own work.

Last but not least, Alexander recommends that writers find inspiration among the obituaries.  I know that I’ve considered writing several bios after reading someone’s obit and discovering that they were a pioneering chemist, a code talker or more.  In addition to straight up obits, Alexander also recommends Find A Grave.  This is a national web site that includes obits and photographs. Sometimes the photo is only the grave marker but others include early photos, midlife photos and more.  If you don’t have a name to look up, you can also look at popular searches, new listings and new photos, and famous graves.

Next time you find yourself waffling around without inspiration, check out one of these sites and, when inspiration strikes, be sure to say thank you to Jann Alexander for sharing her sources of inspiration.

–SueBE

April 20, 2017

The Library of Congress: Research and Idea Generation

Filed under: Uncategorized — suebe @ 1:50 am
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I’ve just become aware of two amazing resources at the Library of Congress.  Or at least I’ve become newly acquainted. The first is a series of primary source sets and the second a especially helpful publication for idea generation, or at least that’s how it works for me.

As many of you probably know, finding primary sources online can be tricky.  It isn’t that nothing is available.  There is actually quite a bit out there.  But finding it when you need it can be another matter altogether.  But authors aren’t the only ones looking for primary sources.  Teachers realize how primarcy sources can entrance young readers.  To help teachers access sources available at the Library, the staff has put together primary source sets ranging from topics as diverse as “found poetry” to “children’s lives at the turn of the twentieth century.”

The first is not a grouping of found poems but resouces that students might use increating their own.  The set includes a teacher’s guide as well as a variety of documents such as copies of print documents and photographs.  The latter set includes historic photos of children at play, a children’s parade and even a children’s book from the time.

The Library of Congress Magazine is published by-monthly with each issue focusing on a theme such as World War I, Presidential Elections, Photography or Food Collections.  The magazine is approximately 32 pages long and a PDF of each issue is available.

Take a look at several issues of this magazine and see if you don’t come away with some new ideas.  I paged through the issue on Food Collections and quickly jotted down three book ideas — a cookbook, a food history/cookbook and a biography.

 

The Library of Congress is both a national treasure and an amazing resource.  Take the time to look through some of the educational guides and the magazines.  You won’t regret it.

–SueBE

January 13, 2017

Story Ideas: Where do they come from?

Filed under: Uncategorized — suebe @ 1:33 am
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light-bulbs-1125016_1920Throughout the month of January, I’m taking part in Storystorm. The goal is to generate 30 ideas in 30 days.  I’m writing this on Thursday the 12th and I currently have 22 ideas.

Early on, because I hadn’t been doing much idea generation, I was going good to come up with one a day.  Yes, I was managing it but it wasn’t pretty.  I’m so far ahead because the other day I came up with 9.  And I have a second one to write down for today.

How do I come up with so many ideas?

One thing is to look for ideas all around you.  I’ve been reading the Storystorm blog posts.  They’re all informative and some have nudged me towards an idea.  Sometimes it isn’t even an idea based on the post itself.  Sometimes I look at the images and one will remind me of something I found researching the Louisiana Purchase Exposition (1904 St. Louis World’s Fair).  The next thing I know, I’m noodling over an idea based on that research.

When you write nonfiction, one idea can also lead to another.  That’s what happened when I started thinking about the World’s Fair.  An idea about Ota Benga (someone brought in as part of an exhibit) led to an idea about using people as exhibits and more.

My daily foreign language study led to an idea about words. Reading the National Science Association newsletter led to an idea about nanomaterials. I’ve come up with ideas based on recent headline news, things I’ve seen posted on social media and more.

While one idea may not lead directly to another, generating ideas on a regular basis seems to have freed up the flow.  This is definitely a habit that I hope to continue after the month and the challenge are over.

That said, if I’m going to generate 300+ ideas in one year, I’m going to have to come up with some way to organize them.

I’m thinking . . . I’m thinking . . .

–SueBE

 

 

December 21, 2016

Step into 2017 with Storystorm

storystormNeedless to say, everyone is a little wound up about 2017.  I mean a little worse than the usual year-end angst.  I’d like to invite all you writers to step into the New Year with Storystorm.

Back in November you might have missed PiBoIdMo or Picture Book Idea Month sponsored by Tara Lazar.  Unfortunately, as I remember correctly, Tara has been having some health problems and needed to postpone this annual event.  She also took the opportunity to expand it to a greater variety of participants.

Obviously, Picture Book Idea Month was also about generating picture book story ideas.  Storystorm expands this to include any writing genre. I guess I should admit that as far as I’m concerned, an idea is an idea.  I may think it is a picture book idea but it turns into middle grade nonfiction.  So I’m pretty jazzed about this change.

The goal if for participants to end the month of January with 30 fresh, new story ideas.  What a great way to start the year!

Registration begins the day of Christmas, December 26th.  You can register through the first week of January.  You don’t have to register, but participants who do are eligible to win agent consultations, books, critiques, and more. The link above will take you to Tara’s blog for more information.

So if you’re looking forward to an excellent writing year in 2017, why not start it with Storystorm?

–SueBE

April 11, 2016

How Original Are Your Ideas?

Filed under: Uncategorized — suebe @ 1:49 am
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Gears, Logo, Question Mark, Light Bulb, Thoughts FlashRecently I saw an interesting TED talk with organizaitonal psychologist Adam Grant.  In the video, he discussed the work habits of original thinkers.  Some of what he had to say really surprised me.

Original thinkers are not the first ones done with a project.  Grant admitted that he is one of those people who starts working on a project the second it is handed to him.  He mulls it over, the makes a list of goals and he gets it done long before it is due.  People in this group tend not to be original because they get to work very quickly.

Original thinkers are not the last ones done.  People who put off working on things too long end up rushing through things.  The don’t have the time to weight the pros and cons of various approaches.  They are late and they need to get it done now.

Original thinkers procrastinate at least a little.  Why?  Because before they get to work they are talking.  They are thinking.  They are doing a bit of research. They are gathering information, weighing pros and cons, bouncing ideas off people and playing with ideas.  They aren’t going with the obvious but they aren’t in a mad rush either.

When I thought about this, it really made sense.  When I brainstorm ideas for something, my first ideas are never my best.  They are warm up ideas, the ones that I come up with while I’m trying to get my brain moving.  If my goal is to come up with ten ideas, my last several ideas seldom contain any gems.  “Good grief.  I’ve got 7 ideas.  Five are really good.  But I can’t stop until I get three more . . . one . . . two . . . done!” At that point, I’m tossing things down just to fill out that list.  My best ideas are somewhere in the middle.

Think about this the next time you start to work on a new project.  The idea you come up with first may be adequate but you can probably do better.  Why not give it a shot?

–SueBE

December 3, 2015

Brainstorming: My PiBoIdMo Experience

brainstorming ideasPiBoIdMo (Picture Book Idea Month) ended on Monday.  Going with the stated goals (30 ideas in 30 days), I have achieved success.  I came up with 33 picture book ideas and 3 middle grade/ya ideas.  What can I say?  I don’t always brainstorm with a G-rating.  All in all I have:

20 fiction ideas.  Yeah, I’m surprised too.  Me — Ms. Nonficiton author has 20 fiction ideas and NO straight-up nonfiction.  Why do I say straight-up nonfiction?  Because I have . . .

4 ideas that could go either way.  As nonfiction they would have a faction feel.  One would easily work as fiction.  The others? I’m not as sure, but I really like 3 of them so will have to play with how to make them work best.

2 based on Bible stories

7 fractured fairy tales.

Out of those ideas, how many will I draft?  You probably understand that I can’t give a definite answer because some ideas seem great until you try to write them and then . . . fizzle.  That disclaimer aside there are thirteen that I definitely want to write including two zombie stories, a survival guide, a Columbus Day story that will be a cummulative tale, a stone soup type story, the fractured fairy tales and one involving food science.  Those are the ones I’m most enthusiastic about but that could change.  After all, I never intentionlly wrote down a bad idea.

There are also the seven ideas that might work.  I don’t dislike them but I’m not sure.  Sometimes if I let something like that percolate a solid idea will come together.

At the moment I’m working on Women in Sports.  I should be done with that two weeks from today. During that time I’ll blog and work on the book and not much else although I might find time to outline a picture book.  How will I choose which one to do first? None of them are more timely than the others so I’ll skim the list and see which one catches my attention.

I hope that your PiBoIdMo brainstorming yielded some results that you can turn into picture books!

–SueBE

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