One Writer’s Journey

January 30, 2018

Draft by Draft: Working Towards a Solid Picture Book Manuscript

Filed under: Uncategorized — suebe @ 2:12 am
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A line of gold marks a repair. It isn’t invisible but it makes an intriguing change much like a rewrite does in your manuscript.

When I draft a picture book, I generally go through four drafts before I have a solid manuscript.  And by solid I mean ready to show people not ready to publish.

In draft 1, I get the story down.  This is just to lay out my concept and get the pacing down and achieve the right number of spreads.  Sometimes I show it to my critique group at this stage.  No, technically it isn’t ready to show people but if I’m experimenting with something they can tell me if my concept is flawed or I need to move things around.

In draft 2, I fix anything that my critique group found if the read draft 1. I make sure that I have everything I need on this spread.  Is there something for the illustrator to illustrate?  If it is nonfiction, are all of my facts in place.  My word count tends to expand a lot from draft 1 to draft 2.  But by the end of draft 2 things look pretty good.

Draft 3 is when I pull the word count back down.  I shift phrases and look for ways to make use stronger verbs and more concrete nouns.  My word generally drops between draft 2 and draft 3.  For some spreads this is my final draft but sometimes it takes one more to get it right.

Draft 4 is when I go through and make sure each and every spread sounds like a picture book.  Not everything is going to be playful and fun but a serious book should be poetic and/or lyrical.  Sometimes my word count goes up a bit in completing this final draft.

A solid manuscript isn’t achieved in a single draft.  Sometimes it helps to think of your rewrites as repairs – these tweaks and adjustments are often what glimmers in the end.

–SueBE

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March 15, 2017

Revision: You Gotta Love It

Filed under: Uncategorized — suebe @ 1:00 am
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So many writers I know want to rush through their revisions.  If they get feedback from an editor, they are determined to turn the manuscript around in two weeks, three at most.  Me?  I want to give myself time to internalize the feedback. I also enjoy seeing the manuscript change and grow.  Why rush it?

In truth, writers really need to love revision.  You rough out the manuscript once.  Once you have a manuscript and have given it time to rest, you are ready to revise.  And you aren’t going to do it in one draft.  My process looks something like that.

  1.  Horrible, scary, terrible, no-good first draft.  Okay, maybe it isn’t that bad but I’m often just slapping it down at this stage.  There are even gaps because I don’t take the time to look up missing information.  I just type myself a note.  FIND OUT WHEN THIS WAS AND WHO WAS THERE.  Then I move on.
  2. During this draft, which is the first revision, I fill in gaps.  I also look for things that need to be shifted from one spot to another.
  3. Are any sections slight?  This is when I bulk them up.  Not that I want them to feel bulky but there has to be enough information to justify a stand alone chapter or section.
  4. Can’t manage that?  Then I combine sections or split something too dense in two.  I’m looking to create balance in this draft.
  5. Now is when I smooth things out and check the reading level.  Too high or too low? This is the time to make adjustments and make it flow.
  6. At last, I print it out and my husband reads it.  Then I take care of any issues he spotted and do a hard copy rewrite.  I always do one rewrite on paper because there are problems that I miss until I see them in print.  This is also when I cut excess words.  Again, I spot things on paper that I wouldn’t see on-screen.

That makes for six drafts total although sometimes I can do it in four.  Either way, that’s one first draft and three to five revisions.  You really need to love revision to make your writing work.

–SueBE

 

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