One Writer’s Journey

August 21, 2014

Message: Work it into your plot

Filed under: Uncategorized — suebe @ 1:36 am
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The very best fictional stories have a strong message.  Some touch on loyalty or family.  Others make us think about faith or forgiveness.

Whatever the message is we have to be careful how we deliver it.  Come on too strong and your work seems preachy.  The problem with this is that if you nag from the pages of your story and no one will want to read it.  It works best when your characters discover the message for themselves in the course of the story.

Merrie Haskell did an amazing job of this in The Castle Behind Thorns.  Admittedly, I might have been impressed because of the timing.  I read this book during the unrest in Ferguson, Mo.  I’m one town over.  My sister and her family live in Ferguson.  Quite frankly, a lot of people in our community need to read a book about letting go of anger.

IF YOU HATE SPOILERS DON’T READ THE REST OF THIS POST BEFORE YOU READ THE BOOK.

On the surface, this is a retelling of Sleeping Beauty.  Sand has grown up in sight of the castle but no one goes there.  In fact no one pays much attention to it.  Then one day he wakes up in the fireplace in the main hall.  Only after a merlin and the princes “wake up” does Sand begin to unravel why he is there, what caused the brambles to grow up around the castle and why they are so dangerous.

The princess was killed, more or less by accident.  Her step-mother meant to put her into a deep sleep.  She tricked a servant into administering the potion.  The brambles arose from the girl’s grave because of the hatred she had for her step-mother.  Only by letting go of these feelings could the brambles be fully dispersed.

This is a novel, so obviously there’s a lot more to it than that but this is a lesson that the author could have shoved right in the reader’s face.  Instead, the reader meets the girl and learns of the harsh treatment she suffered at the hands of this woman as no one stood up for her.  But these two women aren’t the only ones holding onto anger and hurt.  Sand must begin mending things to get to the bottom of it all, both in the girl’s life and in his own.

Readers receive the message only through the plot.  Both plot and subplot support the same message.  Added together this is much more effective than tapping a twelve year old on the shoulder and telling her to let go and quit being a pill.

How can you work the message into your own story?  Read The Castle Behind Thorns and other books that do it well to collect ideas.

–SueBE

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