ALA’s Top Ten Most Frequently Challenged Books of 2010

Not sure what to read next?  Check out the American Library Association’s Top Ten Most Frequently Challenged Books of 2010.  The list below includes the reasons given for the challenges as well as my own personal notes on the books.

And Tango Makes Three by Peter Parnell and Justin Richardson
Reasons: homosexuality, religious viewpoint, unsuited to age group
Sue here:  This book struck me as very straightforward.  Two male penguins raised a penguin chick.

The Absolutely True Diary of a Part-Time Indian by Sherman Alexie
Reasons: offensive language, racism, sex education, sexually explicit, unsuited to age group, violence.
Sue here:  I loved this book.  It was a very realistic depiction of life on and off the reservation.  These boys seemed really . . . real.  So sometimes the language was off color and, let’s face it, they referred to sex just like real teen age boys.  Awesome book.

Brave New World by Aldous Huxley
Reasons: insensitivity, offensive language, racism, sexually explicit.
Sue here:  I have to wonder if parents were objecting to this book when it was on our reading list in high school.

Crank by Ellen Hopkins
Reasons: drugs, offensive language, sexually explicit
Sue here:  I haven’t read this one yet, but I have heard excellent things about it.

The Hunger Games by Suzanne Collins
Reasons: sexually explicit, unsuited to age group, violence

Lush by Natasha Friend
Reasons: drugs, offensive language, sexually explicit, unsuited to age group

What My Mother Doesn’t Know by Sonya Sones
Reasons: sexism, sexually explicit, unsuited to age group
Sue here:  I’ve read other work by Sones and really liked it.

Nickel and Dimed: On (Not) Getting By In America by Barbara Ehrenreich
Reasons: drugs, inaccurate, offensive language, political viewpoint, religious viewpoint

Revolutionary Voices edited by Amy Sonnie
Reasons: homosexuality, sexually explicit

Twilight by Stephenie Meyer
Reasons: religious viewpoint, violence

Sue here:  Over all, do people object to any old mention of religion?  Or do they only get testy when it doesn’t agree with them?  Obviously, my opinion leans towards the latter.  I hope you find something on this list that makes you want to ask questions, think for yourself and voice an opinion.  Nope.  You don’t have to agree with me.  I have a tween.  I’m used to eye rolls and disagreements.  But we also have some very lively discussions.

–SueBE